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Jawbone Member
davidwh64
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-29-2012
Accepted Solution

Definition of light sleep vs sound sleep

[ Edited ]

Just got my band.  What is the definition of deep sleep?  And what is the appropriate amount needed of deep per night?  I found some web sites that refer to N1 N2 N3 and REM.  In the Up log, is deep sleep defined as only N3?  And is the goal 30%?  

 

*A moderator has edited the title of this post so that members of the community can find it more easily.

Jawbone Newbie
Harry
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎12-29-2012
0 Kudos

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

Great question.  I've wondered the exact same question and belive this is where the Jawbone UP is lacking in information.  While the sleep screens are interesting, I have no idea how to interpret them.  Jawbone please give us more insight into the things UP tracks and what it means.  Thanks.

N7
Jawbone Newbie
N7
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-29-2012

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

I would love to know this as well.

Jawbone Member
CTreadwell
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎12-30-2012
0 Kudos

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

Same here.. I would like to know the answer to this question! :smileyhappy:

 

Jawbone Enthusiast
AdamSC
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎01-01-2013
0 Kudos

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

I would also like to know this.

Jawbone Enthusiast
AdamSC
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎01-01-2013

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

[ Edited ]

I did some research and here is a link to a good article on what the definitions of the stages of sleep are according to Jawbone.  

 

Unfortunately this explaination does not really make perfect sense to me.

 

If I am reading it correctly... there are 4 stages of sleep.  The first three seems to be defined as "light sleep"  (even stage 3 which is called deep sleep)  and the fourth stage is REM sleep.  

 

So, this is measuring the difference between REM and NonREM sleep.  If this is the case then my REM sleep is about twice as high as would be expected according to this article.  

 

I am not sure if it measure differences in the 3 stages of NonREM sleep or not.  If it does, it may be separating "Deep sleep"  (stage 3) from "Drwosy Stage" and "Light Sleep" (stages 1 and 2).  

 

Jawbone should post more information on how they are calculating this. 

 

 

 

JawboneAlex
Posts: 1,861
Topics: 59
Kudos: 465
Solutions: 412
Registered: ‎06-25-2012

Re: Definition of light sleep vs sound sleep and how much sound is needed

[ Edited ]

Hi All,

 

While in sleep mode, UP deciphers whether you are awake or asleep by interpreting your movements, helping you track things like how long it takes you to fall asleep, how long you sleep, and interruptions to your sleep during the night.

 

While you are asleep, UP monitors the amplitude, frequency, and consistency of your body’s movements to infer whether you are in deep or light sleep. It is natural for your body to alternate between light and deep sleep throughout the night.  Deep sleep represents the more restful sequences of sleep and provides the largest contribution to how rejuvenating your sleep is.  Light sleep also has a valuable but less understood role. These classifications of sleep are intended for consumer sleep tracking to understand quantity and quality of sleep and are not equivalent to medical sleep cycles and measures.

 

Everyone sleeps differently and there is not a defined target for how much deep sleep you should be getting, though many users aim for 50% of their sleep to be deep.  It may be valuable to consider your average deep sleep share over time to determine what level may be right for you and what factors affect the quality of your sleep.

 

If you want to improve your sleep, including your deep sleep, the National Sleep Foundation recommends you adopt and follow healthy sleep practices, including:

 

  • Maintain a consistent sleep and wake schedule, even on weekends
  • Sleep 7-9 hours per night for adults
  • Create a regular, relaxing bedtime routine such as soaking in a hot bath or listening to soothing music – begin an hour or more before you expect to fall asleep.  Turn off electronics such as tvs, computers, phones, or tablets an hour before bedtime.
  • Create a sleep-conducive environment that is dark, quiet, comfortable, and cool
  • Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows
  • Use your bedroom only for sleep (avoid watching tv, using a computer, or reading in bed)
  • Finish eating at least 2-3 hours before your regular bedtime
  • Exercise regularly during the day or at least a few hours before bedtime
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol products close to bedtime and give up smoking

 

More detail can be found at:

 

http://www.sleepfoundation.org/article/how-sleep-works/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need

 

JawboneAlex

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Jawbone Newbie
wkeilani
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-16-2013

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

What I want to know is if all "light" sleep on the UP is non-REM, and is "deep" sleep part REM and part just deep sleep?  I have read there are 4 stages of "non-REM" sleep, which are described below by WebMD:

The period of NREM sleep is made up of stages 1-4. Each stage can last from 5 to 15 minutes. A completed cycle of sleep consists of a progression from stages 1-4 before REM sleep is attained, then the cycle starts over again.

  • Stage 1: Polysomnography (sleep readings) shows a reduction in activity between wakefulness and stage 1 sleep. The eyes are closed during Stage 1 sleep. One can be awakened without difficulty, however, if aroused from this stage of sleep, a person may feel as if he or she has not slept. Stage 1 may last for five to 10 minutes. Many may notice the feeling of falling during this stage of sleep, which may cause a sudden muscle contraction (called hypnic myoclonia).
  • Stage 2: This is a period of light sleep during which polysomnographic readings show intermittent peaks and valleys, or positive and negative waves. These waves indicate spontaneous periods of muscle tone mixed with periods of muscle relaxation. The heart rate slows and the body temperature decreases. At this point, the body prepares to enter deep sleep.
  • Stages 3 and 4: These are deep sleep stages, with stage 4 being more intense than Stage 3. These stages are known as slow-wave, or delta, sleep. If aroused from sleep during these stages, a person may feel disoriented for a few minutes

WebMD's description of REM sleep does not refer to light or deep, so I'm curious on the UP, where is the REM part?

Jawbone Newbie
orchidwish
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-19-2013

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

I believe more explanation is needed about what the Jawbone algorithm considers deep versus light sleep, since in all other literature sleep architecture is described in four stages plus REM. Telling to customers to aim for whatever sleep is comfortable for them does not tell customers what is considered optimal. I really think we deserve more of the analysis that went into the labeling of the sleep types. 

NBC Jawbone Member
Jawbone Member
NBC
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-26-2013

Re: Definition of light sleep vs deep sleep and how much deep is needed

I suspect, there are limitations to what a wristband can measure in terms of detailed sleep stages compared to the more comprehensive equipment of a sleep lab. Still, Jawbone should communicate a more comprehensive explanation of the feature and its limitations. I know it's great to be like Apple and not believe in manuals, but this deserves a bit more explanation up front. The Lark seems to have similar, but different, pseudo scientific measurements.